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  • American Life in Poetry: Column 219

    As we all know, getting older isn’t hard to do. Time continues on. In this poem, Deborah Warren of Massachusetts asks us to think about the life lived between our past and present selves, as indicated in the marginal comments of an old book.

  • American Life in Poetry: Column 218

    American literature is rich with poems about the passage of time, and the inevitability of change, and how these affect us. Here is a poem by Kevin Griffith, who lives in Ohio, in which the years accelerate by their passing.

  • 2 Poems

    3rd Generation Fire

    Grandpa was Chief,
    so was Dad.
    The first firetruck was parked in a bay under their hardware store.

  • American Life in Poetry: Column 217

    American literature is rich with poems about the passage of time, and the inevitability of change, and how these affect us. Here is a poem by Kevin Griffith, who lives in Ohio, in which the years accelerate by their passing.

  • Husbands and Wives

    1. Hannah

    Hanner Hart, Hanner Hart, they all called me.
    The problem with husbands is, they don’t last!
    After Ed died, I was on my own for 45 years,
    And it was hard times for Hanner Hart.

  • American Life in Poetry: Column 216

    Judy Loest lives in Knoxville and, like many fine Appalachian writers, her poems have a welcoming conversational style, rooted in that region’s storytelling tradition. How gracefully she sweeps us into the landscape and the scene!

  • American Life in Poetry: Column 215

    To commemorate Mother’s Day, here’s a lovely poem by David Wojahn of Virginia, remembering his mother after forty years.

    Walking to School, 1964

    Blurring the window, the snowflakes’ numb white lanterns.