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  • Tramp with the Golden Crown

    A plant that Mother Nature scatters to the rich and poor alike, a notorious weed that has so many ways of getting ahead of us, is unquestionably recognized by more people than any other flowering plant in the world. It’s the “tramp with the golden crown,” the “lion’s tooth,” the scourge of suburban homeowners, the […]

  • Owls

    Few birds have received more admiration throughout history than those priceless wonders designed for darkness, the owls. Look around you and chances are good that an owl peers down at you in some form of art, or perhaps as a toy or a piece of jewelry. One of the several highly-admired owls in our home […]

  • Old-Growth Forests

    Growing up in the small town of Kewaunee, especially during my high school days from 1944 to 1947, taking long weekend hikes in our favorite woods was an absolute tonic, a necessity, for a few of my best friends and me. The privately-owned mixed hardwoods bordering the Kewaunee River on the north and west sides […]

  • Wildlife of the Niagara Escarpment

    Wisconsin has cuesta (pronounced “kway-stah”) formed topography. A cuesta is a land elevation with a gentle slope on one side and a steep cliff on the other. Undoubtedly Wisconsin’s best known, understood and used cuesta is the entire landmass of Door County itself, stretching from the bay of Green Bay on the west to Lake […]

  • Spring Ephemeral Wildflowers

    I began to learn and enjoy spring wildflowers in early childhood in one of my dad’s favorite woods bordering the Kewaunee River, close to his home farm near Slovan. These are still among my favorites today; included are the Hepatica, Trout Lily, Large-flowered Trillium, Bloodroot, Spring Beauty, Dutchman’s Breeches, several different violets and Wild Ginger. […]

  • The Wild Turkey in Door County

    The historical range of the Wild Turkey in Wisconsin, as documented by Schorger in 1943, did not include Door County. These large birds were found mostly in the southern third of the state and their highest abundance was in the southwestern corner. By 1860 they were very uncommon and were completely extirpated by the late […]